Archives for September 2015

On Trial

If you love and need primary sources in your academic life, the Ross Pendergraft Library is currently sampling two new databases on 18th and 19th century digital works for a limited time.

18th Century Collection Online

Search over 180,000 books published during the century in which the United States and France waged wars for independence while wearing leggings.  Find full-text, primary sources on science, literature, religion, law, fine arts, history, and more.  Because the database contains digital reproductions, you will find more than mere full-text.  Browse illustrated works on anatomy, botany, agriculture, and physics.  Read Gulliver’s Travels, Wealth of Nations, the Federalist Papers, and more classics in their original typeface and funky fonts.

*That* Isaac Newton

Newton, Isaac, Sir. Opticks: or, a treatise of the reflexions, refractions, inflexions and colours of light. Also two treatises of the species and magnitude of curvilinear figures. London, MDCCIV. [1704] p.158.

19th Century U.S. Newspapers

For resources more focused on the events of the nineteenth century, including the Civil War, explore the 19th Century U.S. Newspaper database.  Like the resource above, this collection features full-text, digital reproductions of content, including advertisements, illustrations, and classified ads.  However, the database consists entirely of United States newspapers from the 1800’s–a rich resource for primary sources on significant events which shaped our country such as the Trail of Tears, the abolition movement, the Civil War, the Industrial Revolution, European immigration, the gold rush, and the settlement of the American West.

You will also find full-text articles and newspaper issues of the Arkansas Gazette, the Little Rock Republican, and other Arkansas newspapers, featuring a wealth of information about the people, culture, life, and history of early Arkansas.


These databases can both be found on the library’s website–>Research–>Tech Databases page (check the # section).  To search these databases simultaneously, select the Artemis Primary Sources Database.

Like what you see?  Let us know at  Your input helps us build our collection based on your academic needs and interests.  But hurry–the trial for these two resources ends on October 23.