New Databases

The Ross Pendergraft Library is pleased to announce 40 new databases from Gale accessible right now from our list of A-to-Z Databases: http://libguides.atu.edu/az.php

The full list can be seen by visiting our A-to-Z Databases page and scanning all the titles to the right marked “NEW”.

These new databases cover a little bit of everything: business, literature, U.S. history, culinary arts, gardening, criminal justice, and even car maintenance.  While there’s not enough space here to talk about all of them, here’s the highlights for subjects that weren’t previously covered by our older databases:

Chiltonlibrary.com

This database represents the most authoritative automotive repair information available to car owners. If you or someone you know is a gearhead, a Chilton’s manual would have been a required accessory in the garage.  With access to Chiltonlibrary, say goodbye to grease-stained manuals (though, perhaps hello to grease-stained laptops and ipads).  Includes (for some vehicles) labor estimating, maintenance schedules, repair, and recalls.  Some sections include video tutorials. ASE Test prep quizzes are also available.

Diagram of the fuel injection system to a 1972 Ford Pinto

Culinary Arts Collection

Culinary Arts Collection provides access to academic journals and magazines on all aspects of cooking and nutrition. The database includes thousands of searchable recipes, restaurant reviews, and industry information.

Fine Arts and Music Collection

This database provides access to scholarly journals and magazines that support research in areas including drama, music, art history, and film-making. The database emphasizes full-text content for publications included in the Wilson Art Index and RILM bibliography.

Gardening, Landscape and Horticulture Collection

Gardening, Landscape & Horticulture Collection serves horticultural enthusiasts of all levels with more than 3.6 million articles from more than 100 journals, as well as more than 20 reference titles from Delmar, including Handbook of Flowers; Foliage and Creative Design; Computer Graphics for Landscape Architects; and more.

 

A red tulip blooms under the St. Louis Arch under blue skies

Gender Studies Collection

Gender Studies Collection provides balanced coverage of this significant aspect of culture and society. The database offers access to scholarly journals and magazines covering topics including gender studies, family and marital issues, and more.

Student Resources in Context

While primarily geared towards high school students, this resource is rich in curriculum resources for students in secondary education programs. Browse curriculum standards at the state and federal level and find educator resources including lesson plans and worksheets for high school students conducting research and writing papers.

A screenshot of a list of student resources in Context Teacher resources

This list makes up only a small fraction of the resources and databases now available online at our website.  For more information on these databases and how to search them to find what you need, ask us!  Keep checking us out on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for more updates as we continue to bulk up our collections and services.

 

 

Redgunk Tales this Monday, April 9th

Cover of book entitled "RedGunk Tales : Apocalypse and Kudzu from Redgunk, MississippiJoin us on Monday, April 9th in RPL 300B at 7:00 P.M. for a presentation from Dr. Bill Eakin, professor of philosophy and German from the University of the Ozarks, on his book entitled, Redgunk Tales : Apocalypse and Kudzu from Redgunk, Mississippi.  Dr. Eakins will discuss his book as well as tips for publishing short stories.

Redgunk Tales features 13 interwoven stories set in the fictional town of Redgunk, Mississippi, where “the predictable lives of the smothering backwater’s residents are touched by shadowy supernatural events” (Publisher’s Weekly).

Critics have said Dr. Eakin’s stories are like “Thomas Wolfe on acid and James Joyce on moonshine,” and “simultaneously a place of prosaic horror and absolute beauty.”  His most recent literary work has been labeled “a stunning masterpiece” by Andre Dubus, III (House of Sand and Fog).

Dr. Eakins currently lives in Arkansas on a cliff above Piney Bay outside of Russellville. Over one hundred of his short works have appeared in most of the big genre zines, as well as in numerous literary journals.  Many of his stories were recommended by Science Fiction Writers of America for the Nebula Award, and have been reprinted in five book collections, which can be found on Amazon.

Monday’s lecture is part of an ongoing local author series presented by the Ross Pendergraft Library every second Monday of each month.  For more information about this event or the series, contact Luke Heffley at lheffley@atu.edu.

Jonestown Survivor to Speak April 5th

"Don't Drink the Kool Aid : Advice from a Jonesown Survivor" April 5th, 6:00 in RPL 300This Thursday, April 5th, join us for a very special presentation from a survivor of the Jonestown massacre, Laura Johnston.  Her lecture, “Don’t Drink the Kool Aid: Advice from a Jonestown Survivor” will take place in RPL 300.  A reception will be held at 5:30, with the talk scheduled to begin at 6:00 P.M.  She will also sign copies of her book, Jonestown Survivor: An Insider’s Look, following the presentation.

Admission is free and open to the public.  The event is hosted by the ATU Department of Behavioral Sciences, the ATU Department of History and Political Science, and the ATU College of Arts and Humanities.

Kohl was one of 87 members of the Peoples Temple who survived the Jonestown massacre in Guyana on Nov. 18, 1978.  A total of 918 individuals perished in what was the single largest loss of American civilian life by a deliberate act until Sept. 11, 2001.

“I was a member of Peoples Temple for seven years in California before moving to Guyana,” writes Kohl in her bio. “I lived in Georgetown and Jonestown, Guyana, for another nearly two years.  I happened to be in Georgetown with about 80 other survivors when my wonderful friends and adopted family were murdered in Jonestown.  It took me 20 years to accept my survival and rebuild my life.”

Now a bilingual middle school teacher in California, Kohl’s speaking engagements focus on such topics as surviving tragedy, survivors’ guilt, sociology, political science, psychology and the red flags associated with cult dynamics.

Want to learn more about Jonestown before the lecture? The Ross Pendergraft Library had additional resources on this historical tragedy:

For more information about Kohl’s appearance at Arkansas Tech, contact Dr. Joshua Lockyer, associate professor of anthropology, at jlockyer@atu.edu.

 

The Path of an Indie Author

Cover of book, Caroline's LighthouseHave you ever dreamed about writing your own book?  Learn how to make your dream a reality by joining us this Monday, March 12th at 7:00 P.M. in RPL 300B for a special presentation about the writing and publishing process from Brandi Collins, author of the recently published book, Caroline’s Lighthouse

Brandi will discuss her inspiration for writing, her path to independent publishing, and her current and future projects.  A question and answer session will follow the presentation.

This event, sponsored by the Ross Pendergraft Library, is the latest in our “Second Monday” local author series where we invite authors from Tech to share their books with the community.  All of these events are free and open to the public.

Caroline’s Lighthouse, published by Archway Publishing from Simon & Schuster, is a mystery/thriller novel centered on a young woman who has inherited a Virginia lighthouse—the sight of a century-old lovers’ suicide and rumored to be the most haunted place in town.

Aside from being a published author, Brandi Collins is also the licensing, branding, and editorial manager in the University Relations department at Arkansas Tech.  Caroline’s Lighthouse is her first novel.

For more information about the event or the Second Monday series, contact Luke Heffley at 479-964-0569 or lheffley@atu.edu.

 

International Film Festival

The 3rd Annual International Film Festival kicks this Wednesday, Feb. 28th, with a showing of the Nueve Reinas at 7:00 P.M. in Doc Bryan Lecture Hall.  Nueve Reinas (Nine Queesn) is a 2000 Argentine crime drama centering on two con artists who decide to pull off a major scam in stamp collecting.  The film won 21 awards and is considered a classic of Argentina’s film history.

The screening Wednesday night is the first in a month-long celebration of films from around the globe.  The purpose of the festival is to foster an open-minded global cultural identity.

The film festival is sponsored by the Ross Pendergraft Library and the department of English & World Languages.  Principle organizers include Dr. Nelson Ramìrez, associate professor of Spanish, Coordinator of World Languages; Dr. Lowell Lybarger, multimedia librarian and instructor of music; and Philippe Van Houtte, systems librarian and instructor of French.

Each film is registered as an OnTrack event.  For a full schedule of showtimes, visit our website at http://filmfest.atu.edu.   Each film begins at 7:00 P.M. in Doc Bryan Hall and is free to all.  For more information about the film festival, contact Philippe Van Houtte at pvanhoutte@atu.edu.

Schedule listing of film festival schedule

Textbooks in the Library

Every year, at the beginning of every semester, it happens: students approach the Ross Pendergraft Library service desks asking if we have their textbooks.  And every year, it’s usually the same response:

This year, it will be different.  At the request of the Arkansas Tech administration, the library purchased 27 general education textbooks for a new initiative to provide textbook access for general education courses.  The purpose of this program is to help students in dire financial straits or those students whose textbooks are late in arriving for the start of classes.

They are available at the Circulation desk for 2 hour check-out within the library ONLY–they cannot leave the building.

To see our current selection, search our online catalog Find It and select the drop-down “Course Reserves”

screenshot of find it course reserves

Then type “Textbooks”.

screenshot of textbooks list available for checkout.

This will display textbooks available in the course reserves available for checkout.  You can also limit selections by course information using the left filter “Course Information”

screenshot of textbooks filters

If a professor has arranged for a specific book to be placed on course reserve at the library, you can also search by instructor’s name, course code, or course name.

Book checked out?  No worries.  Sign-in to Find It and use your your Tech ID and password, and place a Request:

gif of signing in to find it

Once signed in, use the Request feature to place a hold request on items checked out.  When the item returns, you will get an email to let you know the book is available at the circulation desk.

screenshot of request

If you are a professor and wish to place an extra faculty copy on course reserve for the benefit of students who may be strapped for cash or unable to acquire the book in time for class, consider lending it to the library.  Faculty personal copies are always returned at the end of the semester, and it is a great way to guarantee student access to required course materials.  Learn more about this program by visiting our website http://libguides.atu.edu/services/faculty#course or contact us for more questions about the program and how you can help us.

Remember–not every class will have a textbook available at the library!  However, this new initiative will help make obtaining a college degree slightly more affordable and easier.  If the program is a success, we will purchase more.  So if you need a textbook, come check us out!

 

 

A Change Is Gonna Come

Twas the two weeks before Christmas, and all through the library, not a creature was stirring…except for the half a dozen library and physical plant staff working hard to get a brand new study space ready for next semester.

The Technology Learning Center (TLC), set to open sometime in January, represents the latest effort to create comfortable, useful spaces to study, collaborate, and learn.  The new space, located on the first floor in the microforms room, will feature whiteboards, couches, comfortable chairs, stools, ottomans, desks, and group tables.  During certain hours, this space will also host a satellite version of the Doc Bryan Tutoring Center.

Projected look at the new TLC space featuring chairs and couches and whiteboards

Projected view of new TLC with stools, ottomans, couches, and whiteboards

The library hinted at the new space during finals when we asked for student input on the new name for the center.  While the name suggested by student Collin Honeycutt, “Technology Learning Center” won out, a few noteable runner-ups included the North Commons, the Thinkatorium, Club Pendy, Spacey McSpace Space, and—of course—Study McStudyface.

Projected view of new space with couches and a chair

Projected view of the new study space with two green couches, an ottoman, and a whiteboard

To make room for the new student space, however, sacrifices had to be made.  Room 129 has held the library’s collection of microfilm and microfiche since the building was opened.  The format was considered ground-breaking in the last century for libraries trying to free up space by photographing large swaths of print journals, newspapers, and books and reducing their size to thumbprint sized images on film—requiring only light and magnification to read.  In recent years, resource databases like American Periodical Series, JSTOR, GreenFile, and ERIC have rendered much of this collection redundant.  Why fumble around with microfiche when you can easily access the same content from home with a computer?

To make room for the TLC, a massive weeding project occurred to remove selected titles and collections so that the remaining microfilm and microfiche collection can be consolidated in the adjacent room.  Many microfilmed titles and historical newspapers like the Arka Tech, the Courier, and the Arkansas Gazette remain available, but large sets duplicated by our online resources have been sent to a recycling facility.  If you stretched the recycled fiche end to end, it would total 67 miles—almost enough to reach Little Rock.

Box of fiche

rows and rows of microfiche cabinets

None of this would be possible without the hard and back-breaking work of ATU’s Physical Plant staff who shifted and schlepped heavy cabinets out of and all around the library.  Library staff, too, worked tirelessly throughout the interim period to create lists, estimate space, count withdrawn fiche and film, and empty cabinets.

Marcus McCormick, Mason Sims, Slade Dupuy, and Brent Etzel share the task of emptying ERIC cabinets of over 509,000 sheets of microfiche.

Marcus McCormick, Mason Sims, Slade Dupuy, and Brent Etzel share the task of emptying ERIC cabinets of over 509,000 sheets of microfiche.

Frances Hager, Acquisitions, Serials, and Government Documents librarian, holds up microfilm being consolidated into fewer cabinets.

Frances Hager, project lead, holds up microfilm being consolidated into fewer cabinets.

 

Have questions about the new study space?  Want to learn more about the project?  Want to bemoan the loss of physical media to increasingly online-based platforms?  Cry with us through one of our online platforms at Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Remember, the Ross Pendergraft Library and Technology will be closed from December 22nd until January 1st.  We will re-open on January 2nd for interim hours, M-F, 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. only until regular hours resume on January 16th.  For full list of hours, see our website.

Until then, Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and enjoy the well-deserved break.

An empty room 129 where the library's collection of microfilm and microfiche used to be.

On Trial: Mental Measurements Yearbook with Tests in Print

From now until Dec. 14, take a look at the best resource for finding the right test and testing instruments for your research: Mental Measurements Yearbook with Tests in Print.

This online resource contains a bibliography to all known commercially available English-language tests currently in print.  It also features full-text reviews for more than 13,000 tests in psychology, business, education, and leadership.  This is the most comprehensive, interdisciplinary reference tool for any researcher interested in tests, measurement, and assessment.

To get started, search the database by keyword, test name, test category, purpose, and more.  Results can be limited by whether or not a review is available, subject, date of publication, and publisher.

Screenshot of test results

Each entry will feature a description of the test, prices, scores, population, purpose, and—in most cases—a comprehensive review of the test to help you determine its effectiveness, uses, and potential pitfalls.

screenshot of concussion vital signs entry

Currently, the library has Mental Measurements Yearbook and Tests in Print in book form in the Reference Collection.  The online version pairs the listings of all Tests in Print with the reviews of all published volumes of Mental Measurements, making this a one-stop shop for comprehensive test information without ever having to leave your home or office.

With the online version, you can search across all volumes and all 13,000 reviews with keywords and subject searches.  You can also capture and import reviews and content through the familiar set of tools common to all our EBSCOhost products: save, email, permanent link, and import into Refworks.

If you are not sure where to begin in your quest for tests, take a look at this research guide about Tests and Measures.  It includes information about other resources for tests as well as handy hints for finding unpublished & non-commercial tests.

Does Mental Measurements measure up?  You be the judge!  Let us know by texting us at 479-802-4876 or emailing the collection liaison for Behavioral Sciences and Business, Angela Black, at ablack9@atu.edu.   Hurry, the trial ends on Dec. 14th—help us test out this potential resource!

Mental Measurements Yearbook from EBSCO on Vimeo.

Celebrate International Education Week With Pronounciator

As the Arkansas Tech family celebrates other cultures throughout the world with International Education Week, many of you may find yourselves wondering how to say “More Tikka Masala please” in Hindi.  Before you run out to buy Rosetta Stone, take advantage of the language-learning software called Pronunciator, available free for Arkansas Tech students, faculty, and staff.

screenshot of pronunciator home screen

To get started and help you track your progress, you will need to create your own account at first using your ATU email address.

Once logged in, you have your choice between 80 non-English languages.  If you are a non-native English speaker, no problem–the service also provides ESL courses for speakers of 51 non-English languages including Chinese, Arabic, Spanish, Japanese, Swedish and many more.

Learn at your own pace, have a live conversation, or, for targeted objectives, learn through guided courses.  The guided courses range from early learners (3-6 years old), young learners (7-12 years old), 8-week travel prep, beginner courses, and even a healthcare course.  Choose the main guide to independently roam and explore the language through “postcards” where you can learn common expressions, cultural information, and more.

screenshot of description of courses

Get the most out of Pronunciator using a microphone and headphones, which allow you the ability to practice speaking the language.  Pronunciator will play your recorded phrases back to you in comparison with the native speaker, provide drills to score how well you pronounce certain words and phrases, and offer assistance when you just can’t get the hang of it.

As you progress in each language, Pronunciator will let you review your overall progress and stats.  You can also take practice quizzes, review flashcards, and nail your rolling R’s with drills.

Not only can you learn a language structured in a learning course, Pronunciator doubles as handy phrasebook, giving you instant access to probably the most important phrase you’ll ever need to know:

Remember, there is also a Pronunciator App for mobile devices, capable of syncing to your existing account.  No matter where you are in the lesson, your phone or tablet can take your progress with you on the flight, train, ocean liner, or rickshaw.

screenshot of pronunciator app

Have a question about Pronunciator, the library, or where to find the best brunch in Stockholm?  Ask us!  You can also find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.   

Craft Beer Presentation at Ross Pendergraft Library

cover image of Dr. Chapman's book, "Untapped" featuring a tall glass of beer with glasses, a mustache, and a beard made of hopsJoin us at the Library on Monday, November 13th, at 7:00 P.M., for a tall, frosty glass of knowledge about the cultural dimensions of craft beer as presented by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Arkansas Tech.  This free event will be held at RPL 300B—all are welcome.

As part of the Library’s Second Monday author series, Dr. Chapman will discuss the rise of craft beer from social and cultural perspectives.  He is the co-editor of Untapped: Exploring the Cultural Dimensions of Craft Beer, a collection of 12 previously unpublished essays that analyze the rise of craft beer and explore many diverse topics from activism at beer festivals to how craft beer is revitalizing cities and local economies.

Chapman is currently conducting research on gender and consumption in the craft beer industry and the construction of authenticity in craft brewing.  If you are interested in subjects like business, race, gender, politics, or simply craft beer, check out this book from the library or come check out his presentation Monday night.

While no actual craft beer will be on hand at the library, guests are welcome to fill their glass with insight into an increasingly popular cultural phenomenon.  Stay buzzed on other events scheduled in the library, including our next 2nd Monday author series, by liking us on Facebook, following us on Twitter, or by seeing us on Instagram.  Cheers!