Stream Into Fall 2020

The Ross Pendergraft Library is preparing for the fall by finding more online resources for whatever the future brings.  In anticipation for a potential online environment for some classes, we have added a new collection of streaming films from Swank Digital Campus.

A row of film movie posters such as 3:10 to Yuma, Amelie, the Big Sick, Blade Runner

An initial collection of fifty Hollywood films have been added to the platform and reflect films slated to be taught and discussed for the fall 2020 curriculum.  These include international films, class films, and critically acclaimed films from a variety of genres.  Search for individual films in the search box or browse by genre for comedies, horror, crime films, drama, and more.

To access the films, go to the library’s homepage and select A-to-Z Databases.  From there, navigate to Swank by browsing our alphabetical list of databases or searching for Swank in the search box.

If you are off-campus, you may be first prompted to login with your Tech Username and Password.

If this is your first-time accessing Swank, you may be asked whether to enter as a student or login as a faculty member.  If you select “Student”, it takes you right to the main browse page.  If you select “Faculty,” you will be asked to create a separate account that enables you to request new movies for your class.  However, as a faculty member, you can always contact your librarian liaison to request new streaming films.

If you select a film, you can watch it immediately in the browser window, copy a permanent link, or copy an LMS link that you can use to embed directly into Blackboard:

A film description for "Do the Right Thing" highlighting the copy direct link and copy lms link

Each film includes the ability to display or hide subtitles.  If you want to watch on a mobile device like a phone or tablet, download the Swank Media Player from your app store.  Then navigate to the library’s Swank website on your device.

Swank Media Player app information, including logo that looks like a film reel.

If you need a bigger selection than Swank, the library has three other streaming video platforms from which to choose films and documentaries:

  • Academic Video Online – A large collection of over 13,000 films, documentaries, news reels, tutorials, interviews, and archive footage on a variety of subjects. Search for individual films or browse by channels.  Most of the content will be educational or documentary films.
  • Kanopy – A small collection of individual films requested by faculty for specific courses, for a limited duration.
  • Digital Theatre Plus – A specialized collection of full-length films of Shakespeare plays, modern dramas, and musicals. There are behind the scenes clips from theatre makers and study guides to help students understand plot, character, language, etc. Audio plays from the LA Theatre Works have now been added.

We also have an extensive collection of physical DVDs to check out whenever the library is open.  All are searchable via our online database, Find It.

During the break, we hope you stay safe, stay socially distant, and stay entertained with Swank Digital Campus.  The library is still open, and the librarians are still available to help you with research as well as our preferred ranking of all James Bond films.  Just reach out and Ask Us!

New Online Resources During Coronavirus Pandemic

During this unprecedented time where availability of online resources for teaching and learning is more critical than ever, the Ross Pendergraft Library has taken advantage of database trials and free offers to expand our collections, even if temporarily.

In the last month, we’ve brought online several databases–too many to feature here.  You can find an updated listing of new resources, updated resources, and database trials at our resource guide here: https://libguides.atu.edu/spring2020databasetrials.  A deeper dive into a few of those resources below.  Keep in mind, many of these resources are being offered until the semester is completed.

Kanopy

This is a streaming video platform available at the library through our A-to-Z list. Recently, this platform has been updated significantly and now features new videos such as The Great Courses and 16 other films and documentaries.  This newer content will be available for the next four weeks, but other videos are part of a licensed collection.  If faculty wish to order a film, they contact their departmental liaison or fill out the request form available on Kanopy via search.


Screenshot of Kanopy, featuring the Great Courses

JSTOR

The Ross Pendergraft Library now enjoys full access to all available JSTOR collections from now until June 30th.  JSTOR is a multi-disciplinary database featuring current and archived articles, primary sources, and ebooks.  Previously, we were limited to just a few of their collections like Arts and Sciences and Life Sciences.  But now, our access has expanded to articles in business, ecology, and a variety of disciplines.  We now also have access to primary source collections such as “Global Plants” and “19th Century British Plants.”  There are also several thematic collections on topics like Sustainability, Security Studies, and Lives of Literature.

Screenshot of JSTOR, a multi-disciplinary database

Social Explorer

Social Explorer is an online research tool which provides quick and easy access to historical census data and demographic information. It creates maps and reports to help users visually analyze and understand demography and social change throughout history.  The database will be on trial for the rest of the semester.

Screenshot from Social Explorer database showing that 21% of Pope County persons 18 years or older are smokers

Colonial State Papers

The Colonial State Papers offers access to over 7,000 hand-written documents and more than 40,000 bibliographic records with this incredible resource on Colonial History. In addition to Britain’s colonial relations with the Americas and other European rivals for power, this collection also covers the Caribbean and Atlantic world. It is an invaluable resource for scholars of early American history, British colonial history, Caribbean history, maritime history, Atlantic trade, plantations, and slavery.  This database is currently on trial until April 27th.

Screenshot from a result in Colonial Papers detailing an exchange regarding Salem witch trials from Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham

At this time, many other new resources and database trials are currently being negotiated, and we will continue to update this page as more resources come online.  Check back with us or stay tuned by following us on social media: InstagramFacebook, or Twitter.

In the meantime, stay safe, keep calm, and research on!

Be Discovered With the Online Research Commons @ ATU

Tired of your research not getting noticed?  Worried that your work will not be valued, shared, or read by the rest of the world?  The Ross Pendergraft Library has created Tech’s very own institutional repository designed to showcase ATU faculty and student scholarly research at the Online Research Commons.

homepage of the Online Research Commons @ ATU featuring photo of Patrick Hagge

The Online Research Commons (ORC) is Tech’s repository of scholarly publications, presentations, theses, dissertations, digital collections, and institutional archives.  It seeks to bring together all of a university’s research under one umbrella with an aim to preserve and provide access to that research.  Documents uploaded to the Online Research Commons are indexed in Google and GoogleScholar—making them discover-able and available to other scholars around the world.

GoogleScholar result for an article from Dr. David Blanks on Edward O. Wilson

Under “Faculty Research and Publications”, you can browse the research being produced and published by faculty at Arkansas Tech University, organized by department or discipline.   Users can also browse by Authors or search the repository by keyword.

Since the ORC launched a few months ago, only a few academic departments like Emergency Management, Physical Sciences, and History & Political Science have been populated with publications.  But as the ORC grows, it will contain citations, links to library-subscribed content, or direct PDFs to all faculty work including articles, working papers, conference proceedings, books, book chapters, technical reports, sound files, data sets, images, videos, and more from all areas at Arkansas Tech.

Authors who submit their work to the repository receive monthly reports regarding usage and downloads.  A map summary of downloads for all documents in the repository is freely available on the ORC homepage:

Map of the world detailing locations of users downloading documents from the Online Research Commons

Also included in the ORC are the full-text of all Arkansas Tech student dissertations and theses published since 2016.   It also currently includes selected issues of the digitized Arkansas Tech yearbook, Agricola.

A list of three digitized Agricolas, the official yearbook of Arkansas Tech.If you want your work to be showcased and included in the Online Research Commons, simply send a CV or list of publications to orc@atu.edu.  For more information on the submission process, including what versions of publications can be included, be sure to review the Submission Guide to Online Research Commons @ ATU.  Adding to our repository is free, easy, and can be an excellent vehicle for working papers, presentations, and conference papers not published elsewhere.  So, get noticed, get discovered, and get your legacy preserved at Arkansas Tech’s Online Research Commons.

Submit Your CV

 

5 Free Things at the Tech Library

The new fall semester has begun, and for many of you, this will be the most expensive four years of your life. To alleviate the wallet stress, the Library is here to help stretch your dollar and expand your mind with five free things you can borrow from the Ross Pendergraft Library.

1. Gen. Ed. Textbooks

Through a pilot program launched last year, the Library been obtaining copies of textbooks required for the General Education classes offered at Tech.  Currently, any student can borrow a general education textbook for up to two hours of in-library use.  To see if we your required book, search our online database under Course Reserves:

Screenshot of browsing the word Textbooks in our online database to find all course reserve textbooks

To see ALL the textbooks in the program, search for the word “Textbooks.”  You can also ask the friendly faces at the Circulation Desk for help.

2. Calculators

Need a TI-30X for an upcoming test?  Borrow one for 24 hours at the Library.  Not only do we have the TI-30X, we also have TI-83’s, TI-84’s, and other graphing calculators which have inexplicably not gotten cheaper in twenty years.

Images of three calculators including a TI-30XS, a TI-84 Plus, and a TI-84 Plus CE all available to check out at the library

Stop by the Circulation Desk for help with all your calculating needs.

3. Games (NEW!)

A new collection has been added to the Ross Pendergraft Library over the summer: Games!  Table-top, board, role-playing, strategy, and old-fashioned family fun games.  The Games section is located around the corner from the Young Adult Fiction collection, on the north side of the library’s first floor.

Shelf of games

You can check them out as you would a book at the Circulation Desk.  To browse them all, search our online catalog for “Games” in Location “Games”.

4. Space

You can reserve some space.  Not outer space, but meeting space within Tech Library.  To reserve a room, go to our homepage, and find the giant button at the bottom of our website called “Reserve a Study Room.”

Reserve a Study Room

Select up to two green boxes for a 2 hour stay, per day, per person.  You can reserve a small study space, a larger room for up to 4 for group meetings, or the Tegrity Room for audio recordings or exams.

Schedule indicating study rooms to reserve and which are full.

5. Help

You can also, at any time, borrow help from any one of the kind, helpful, and super-awesome library staff of experts who are available at the Reference Desk, Circulation Desk, 2nd Floor Help Desk, and wandering the stacks like information roombas.

I swear to you it is a cat, dressed as a shark, on a roomba chasing a small duckling.

We just want to help you find books, stop running away!

We can help you find quality research resources, provide citation guidance, suggest good research topics, locate full-text articles, or show you how to print your assignment from your phone.  We are also a text, email, phone call, DM, PM, or online chat away:

Best wishes for Fall 2019!

Spring Break!

The Ross Pendergraft Library is going on spring break!  At least for a few extra hours during the week.  Here’s the schedule for our reduced hours during spring break:

  • Saturday, March 16th – CLOSED
  • Sunday, March 17th – CLOSED
  • Monday, March 18th-Friday, March 22nd – 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
  • Saturday, March 23rd – CLOSED
  • Sunday, March 24th – Resumes regular hours, 1:00 P.M. to 1:00 A.M.

If you are planning a long trip, don’t forget the library has a collection of Audiobooks on CD and MP3 that you can pop in the car stereo or download to your phone for bluetooth broadcast. Here’s a few new titles, fresh on the shelf:

book cover of Children of Blood and Bone featuring illustration of upper half of the face of a beautiful, mysterious woman with long white hair rising up behind her.Children of Blood and Bone – Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls. But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope.

Front cover of Educated, featuring a large illustration of a sharpened end of a pencil with a shadow of a girl on a mountain drawn into the pencilEducated : a memoir – Traces the author’s experiences as a child born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, describing her participation in her family’s paranoid stockpiling activities and her resolve to educate herself well enough to earn acceptance into a prestigious university and the unfamiliar world beyond.

The Good Neighbor : the Life and Work of Fred Rogers – Drawing on original interviews, oral histories and archival documents, the author traces the iconic children’s program host’s personal, professional, and artistic life through decades of work.  Narrated by LeVar Burton.

Stephen King's cover of Pet Sematary featuring a cat so scary I can't even describe it in the alt text.Pet Sematary: A novel – When Dr. Louis Creed takes a new job, and moves his family to the idyllic, rural town of Ludlow, Maine, this new beginning seems too good to be true. Yet despite Ludlow’s tranquility, there’s an undercurrent of danger that lingers like the graveyard in the woods near the Creed’s home, where generations of children have buried their beloved pets.  This Stephen King classic is narrated by Michael C. Hall.

Front cover of book featuring Eric Idle dressed up as a knight from Monty Python and the Holy GrailAlways Look On the Bright Side of Life : A Sortabiography – From the ingenious comic performer, Eric Idle, founding member of Monty Python, and creator of Spamalot, comes an absurdly funny memoir of unparalleled wit and heartfelt candor.

 

Cover of book featuring a couple clothed in roses.The Greatest Love Story Ever Told – Presented as an oral history in a series of conversations between the couple, the book features anecdotes, hijinks, photos, and a veritable grab bag of tomfoolery. This is not only the intoxicating book that Megan Mullally’s and Nick Offerman’s fans have been waiting for, it might just hold the solution to the greatest threat facing our modern world: the single life.

 

Redgunk Tales this Monday, April 9th

Cover of book entitled "RedGunk Tales : Apocalypse and Kudzu from Redgunk, MississippiJoin us on Monday, April 9th in RPL 300B at 7:00 P.M. for a presentation from Dr. Bill Eakin, professor of philosophy and German from the University of the Ozarks, on his book entitled, Redgunk Tales : Apocalypse and Kudzu from Redgunk, Mississippi.  Dr. Eakins will discuss his book as well as tips for publishing short stories.

Redgunk Tales features 13 interwoven stories set in the fictional town of Redgunk, Mississippi, where “the predictable lives of the smothering backwater’s residents are touched by shadowy supernatural events” (Publisher’s Weekly).

Critics have said Dr. Eakin’s stories are like “Thomas Wolfe on acid and James Joyce on moonshine,” and “simultaneously a place of prosaic horror and absolute beauty.”  His most recent literary work has been labeled “a stunning masterpiece” by Andre Dubus, III (House of Sand and Fog).

Dr. Eakins currently lives in Arkansas on a cliff above Piney Bay outside of Russellville. Over one hundred of his short works have appeared in most of the big genre zines, as well as in numerous literary journals.  Many of his stories were recommended by Science Fiction Writers of America for the Nebula Award, and have been reprinted in five book collections, which can be found on Amazon.

Monday’s lecture is part of an ongoing local author series presented by the Ross Pendergraft Library every second Monday of each month.  For more information about this event or the series, contact Luke Heffley at lheffley@atu.edu.

Textbooks in the Library

Every year, at the beginning of every semester, it happens: students approach the Ross Pendergraft Library service desks asking if we have their textbooks.  And every year, it’s usually the same response:

This year, it will be different.  At the request of the Arkansas Tech administration, the library purchased 27 general education textbooks for a new initiative to provide textbook access for general education courses.  The purpose of this program is to help students in dire financial straits or those students whose textbooks are late in arriving for the start of classes.

They are available at the Circulation desk for 2 hour check-out within the library ONLY–they cannot leave the building.

To see our current selection, search our online catalog Find It and select the drop-down “Course Reserves”

screenshot of find it course reserves

Then type “Textbooks”.

screenshot of textbooks list available for checkout.

This will display textbooks available in the course reserves available for checkout.  You can also limit selections by course information using the left filter “Course Information”

screenshot of textbooks filters

If a professor has arranged for a specific book to be placed on course reserve at the library, you can also search by instructor’s name, course code, or course name.

Book checked out?  No worries.  Sign-in to Find It and use your your Tech ID and password, and place a Request:

gif of signing in to find it

Once signed in, use the Request feature to place a hold request on items checked out.  When the item returns, you will get an email to let you know the book is available at the circulation desk.

screenshot of request

If you are a professor and wish to place an extra faculty copy on course reserve for the benefit of students who may be strapped for cash or unable to acquire the book in time for class, consider lending it to the library.  Faculty personal copies are always returned at the end of the semester, and it is a great way to guarantee student access to required course materials.  Learn more about this program by visiting our website http://libguides.atu.edu/services/faculty#course or contact us for more questions about the program and how you can help us.

Remember–not every class will have a textbook available at the library!  However, this new initiative will help make obtaining a college degree slightly more affordable and easier.  If the program is a success, we will purchase more.  So if you need a textbook, come check us out!

 

 

Back to School

Welcome home and welcome back!  The Library is open and ready for new and returning students & faculty.  Over the summer, we’ve really bulked up with new services, new hours, and new databases designed to help everyone keep calm and carry on through the academic life of Tech.  Here’s the top five things you should know about Tech’s most popular destination for studying, printing, and researching.

We’re Open Late…Really Late

The Library is the best and ONLY place on campus open for studying, printing, and meeting after midnight at Tech.  From Sunday through Thursday, we remain open until 1:00 AM and continue to offer excellent and slightly over-caffeinated service long after other offices and buildings close.

In addition, the Library will now offer extended hours on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.  Beginning Friday, August 25th, the library will remain open until 8:00 P.M. on Fridays and Saturdays during the regular fall semester.  Additionally, we will open early on Sunday’s at 1:00 PM beginning Sunday, August 27th.

hours for the library in a chart.

Check our website for full schedules, special hours during holidays, and our upcoming 24-hour schedule at finals.  Feel free to bring in a coffee (with a lid) and burn the midnight oil with us.

We Got the Prints

We know many students at Tech only come to the library for the printers.  And that’s ok!  But if you are new, the act of printing can be a little confusing.  Here’s a step-by-step introduction on how to print:

  1. Login to a computer in the General Lab.
  2. Press Ctrl + P or find a Printer Icon to print your academic paper, course schedule, or cute cat pics.
  3. Choose “Dell Universal Print Queue” as your printer and select “Print”
  4. Get up and look for the printer stations. These are separate computers next to a large laser printer.
  5. Login with your Tech Username/Password or simply swipe your ID at the station.  You should see your document ready to print.  You’ll also see the balance on your account and the cost of the job.
  6. If everything looks right, press print.

Prints costs $0.10 a page in black and white, but we also have a color printer that eats up $0.30 a page.  Every student starts with $20 on their account each semester.  But if you run out of money on your account, you can always top it off with cash at the PHIL station, next to Circulation Desk.

If something goes wrong or you can’t find the right printer, friendly staff are standing by on all floors to help with this very thing.

You Can Get a Room

image of bookit chart with red squares indicating booked rooms and green squares indicating free rooms

The Library offers study rooms, multimedia-use rooms, and even an audio lab to record songs, mix music, or narrate video.  Reserve space using our online reservation system, Book It.   The Library has 5 study rooms that can be reserved by any Tech faculty, staff, or student on a first come, first serve basis.

If you need to make a Tegrity recording, reserve one of our Multimedia rooms.  These all-purpose rooms allow you to record yourself taking an exam for instructors, create video or audio presentations, or use interactive software such as Read & Write Gold or Pronunciator.

screenshot of how to book a tegrity room from the Book It dropdown.

If you need to make a podcast or lay down some sick beats, you might want to book some time in our new Audio Lab.  Open to all students, faculty, and staff, the audio lab contains sophisticated software and hardware designed to create professional recordings.   Professional staff are standing by to help you learn the software and make something amazing.

a picture of a woman's hands manipulating a Mini mixing board

We’re All About That (Data)base

Need research?  We have all that in one easy-to-use search:

Screenshot of our find it search engine. There's a blank to search articles, books, and moreSearch and find scholarly articles, books, DVDs, streaming video, or calculators using our search engine for all things Tech Library.  Not sure how to find something in Find It?  See this handy guide for getting the most out of your searches: http://libguides.atu.edu/FindIt

If you need something more specialized, see our list of A-to-Z databases, containing over 200 topical databases for every subject or format need.

We’re Better Than Google

google search result indicating that librarians are the secret masters of the universe.

A search engine will never replace the listening, knowledgeable, and compassionate humans at the Library (at least…not yet).  We have dedicated, friendly staff poised to drop anything to help you succeed.  We thrive on questions, and chase after answers like the professional information hunters that we are.  When you are in need of an answer and don’t know who to call, call us: (855) 761-0006.  We may not always know the answer, but we know the right place to find it.  You can also ask us a question via Ask-A-Librarian or text us at (479) 802-4876.

So come by this semester, either online or in-person, and let us help you find the answers, book a study room, or print your cat pictures.  In the meantime, welcome (back) to Tech and good luck!

 

Stuff @ Circulation

Did you know that DVDs are not the only thing you can check-out at the Ross Pendergraft Library?  The Circulation Desk, located on the first floor, keeps an entire collection of supplies and materials that you can freely borrow for a few hours to power up your late-night study sessions and keep more money in your pocket.

Here’s a few of the things you might want to acquire during the long study nights ahead:

Dry Erase Boards

Dry Erase Boards are Remarkable!

These are brand new, 4 x 3 feet, mobile, magnetic, reversible, and remarkable dry erase boards that you can check out for the low, low price of nothing.  Borrow for two hours, then renew for another two hours, if needed.  They offer large writing space to draw out all your molecular diagrams, musical arrangements, mathematical formulas, and next year’s NCAA basketball brackets.  Pairs well with our dry erase markers.

Dry Erase Markers

set of dry erase markers

What can you do with a dry erase board without dry erase markers?  Don’t find out by borrowing a set of markers at the Circulation Desk.  Each set of markers includes 8, multi-colored thick point markers, 4 black fine-point markers, an eraser, and a bottle of cleaner.  You can check them out for two hours and renew them for another two.

Graphing Calculators

Graphing calculators

Why have computers come down in price, but a graphing calculator still costs the same as it did twenty years ago?  Some mysteries may never be solved, but if you still haven’t saved up the bucks to buy one, and just need a loaner for a few hours, the Library has the TI-83, TI-83 Plus, and the TI-83 Plus Silver available for four hour check-out.  Four hours!  You can renew it for another four, as well, which is probably more time with a graphing calculator than is recommended by the American Psychological Association.

Headphones

Experience two hours of moderately okay sound with our sturdy, pre-sanitized, and surprisingly comfortable headphones.  These headphones have circulated hundreds of times, making them the most popular item available in the library.  Don’t you want to be popular too?  Wear the same headphones as everyone else in the library, and you’re well on your way.

Now, I know what you must be thinking: Free stuff is great, but is there a way I can spend money, too?  There is!  Here are some of the items currently offered at cost to help you avoid a trip to the bookstore or a large 24-hour big-box chain.  (Cash only!)

  • Small Scantrons: $0.20
  • Large Scantrons: $0.40
  • Earbuds: $1.50
  • Helpful customer service from friendly people: Priceless

The Circulation desk—your source for the treasures above and more—operates as long as the library is open (though some of the services are reduced during the wee hours of the open-24-hours-for-finals period).  So when the bookstore is closed, and you don’t have a friend to take you to the store, come see us!  We won’t be your friend or anything (we barely know you), but we can sell you a Scantron and let you borrow our headphones.  Which is kind of like something a friend would do.

Black History Month

This month, the Ross Pendergraft Library highlights some of our newest acquisitions in books, DVDs, and databases to celebrate the achievements of African Americans and document the struggles they have overcome to help make America truly great.

The March: Book One, Book Two, & Book Three
march

Winner of the 2016 National Book Award, the March graphic novel trilogy (Book One, Book Two, & Book Three) tells the story of the Civil Rights movement from the first-hand accounts of Representative John Lewis.  Lewis, now a congressmen serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, was a member of the “Big Six” Civil Rights leaders and helped organize and lead many of the important events of the Civil Rights movement, including the Freedom Summer, the Selma voting rights campaign, the Nashville lunch counter sit-in movement, bus boycotts, and more.  He was an original member of the Freedom Riders, and endured imprisonment, tear gas, and physical beatings so severe that he still bears physical scars to this day.

Selma. As significant as it was, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 made NO provision to ensure the rights of African-Americans to register to vote. In more than two years of SNCC-Led work organizing and protesting in Selma, we registered fewer than 100 new voters. And thanks to Judge Hare's Injunction against public gatherings, SNCC's operations in Selma had ground to a halt. Dr. King met with President Johnson in December, shortly after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. They discussed the need for a voting rights act, but president Johnson said it was impossible. The votes in Congress were simply not there. Johnson said, in effect: If you WANT a voting rights act, MAKE me do it. When Dr. King returned to Atlanta, he accepted an invitation from an organization called the Dallas County Improvement Association, requesting SCLS to help the people of Selma.

The March trilogy details many of these events with co-author Andrew Aydin and stunning visual illustration from best-selling artist Nate Powell.   Immerse yourself in this moving, richly drawn and sometimes shocking first-hand account of the Civil Rights Movement from a man who lived in the center of it.  This trilogy and other books are available for check-out at the Black History Display table, just across from the elevators on the first floor.

Kehinde Wiley : A New Republic

Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness, a painting by Kehinde Wiley.

Lose yourself in the beauty and detail of Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic–a collection of nearly 60 paintings and sculptures published as a retrospective of his work to coincide with his touring exhibit.  Specializing in naturalistic portraiture of contemporary African Americans in the style of Old Master paintings, Wiley’s works have been shown in the National Portrait Gallery, the Columbus Museum of Art, and in galleries around the world.  Included in the volume are critical essays and full-color paintings and sculpture of African American figures, as well as people from Africa, India, South America, Israel and around the world.

Napoleon Leading the Army Over the Alps, a painting by Kehinde Wiley

It is a book worth checking out.   Look for it at the Black History Month Display table, just across from the elevators on the first floor.

Race : The incredible true story of gold medal winner, Jesse Owens

Cover of Race DVD featuring Jesse Owens running against a backdrop of Nazi flags

Based on the true story of Jesse Owens, Race is a historical film documenting the life of the most famous track and field athlete in world history.  His four gold medal wins during the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin dealt a staggering blow to Hitler’s propaganda of the superiority of Aryan white supremacy, and the world records he set there remained intact for decades after.   The Race is directed by Stephen Hopkins and stars Stephan James as Jesse Owens.  It is available for check-out in the New DVD section on the first floor of the library.

Selma

Cover of Selma featuring actors portraying MLK Jr., Coretta Scott King, and more.

Selma portrays the true story of the 1965 historic voting rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, during the heart of the Civil Rights movement.  Directed by Ava DuVernay and starring David Oyelwo, Cuba Gooding Jr., Oprah Winfrey and Carmen Ejogo, the film focuses on the efforts of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to organize a protest march for the voting rights of African Americans in the segregated South.  This march, and the nationally-televised violent response to it, highlighted racial injustice and helped earn broader support for the passage of the Voting Rights Act.  The film itself has been criticized for its inaccurate portrayal of Lyndon B. Johnson, but has also received wide-spread critical praise including four Golden Globe nominations, and a Best Picture nomination from the Academy Awards.  It is available for check-out in the New DVD section on the first floor of the library.

African American Newspapers Collection

Looking for primary sources in African American History?  Look no further than the African American Newspapers Collection, a database featuring African American newspapers from the nineteenth century.  Read first-hand accounts of major events published in black-owned newspapers.  Titles include The Christian Recorder, The Colored American, Frederick Douglass’ Paper, Freedom’s Journal, and more.  Articles range in scope from eye-witness accounts of the Civil War and the horrific conditions of slavery to more mundane announcements like obituaries, personal notices, and poetry. You can search using keywords or browse issues online through our A-to-Z list of Databases or at this direct link.

The masthead for the Frederick Douglass' Paper, November 6, 1851

For more books, films, and databases celebrating Black History Month, ask your friendly neighborhood librarians at askalibrarian@atu.edu.

A picture of a librarian saying, "My Dear Children, Read. Read Everything". From The March, Book One, p. 4